Diurnal Movement

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The Sun's Daily Motion often is used as Directional Key

The distance a planet moves within a 24 hour period. There can be considerable variation in this value for planets that have retrograde motion (Stationary Phase), especially in the case of the inner planets Mercury and Venus:

Planet Average Maximum Minimum[1]
A35_150.gif Moon 13° 10' 35" 16° 30' 00" 11° 45' 36"
A34_146.gif Mercury 1° 23' 00" 2° 25' 00" − 1° 30' 00"
A25_087.gif Venus 1° 12' 00" 1° 22' 00" − 0° 41' 12"
A39_209.gif Sun 59' 08" 1° 03' 00" 57' 10"
A33_140.gif Mars 31' 27" 52' 00" − 26' 12"
A29_112.gif Jupiter 4' 59" 15' 40" − 8' 50"
A26_087.gif Saturn 2' 01" 8' 48" − 5' 30"
A40_238.gif Uranus 42" 4' 00" − 2' 40"
A38_160.gif Neptune 24" 2' 25" − 1' 45"
a13_174_pluto4.gif Pluto 15" 2' 30" − 1' 48"
Chiron symbol (fixed width).svg Chiron 2' 00" 10' 00" − 6' 00"
A21_039.gif Ceres 12' 40" 30' 00" − 16' 00"
a03_168_pallas.gif Pallas 12' 20" 40' 30" − 22' 30"
A28_111.gif Juno 14' 15" 39' 00" − 18' 00"
a05_243vesta.gif Vesta 16' 15" 36' 00" − 17' 32"

(° = degree of arc, ' = minute of arc, " = second of arc)

See also

Weblinks

Notes and References

  1. "Minimum" means the fastest retrograde motion, not the stationary period, and it is negatively marked by -