Raabe, Wilhelm

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Name
Raabe, Wilhelm Gender: M
born on 8 September 1831 at 18:00 (= 6:00 PM )
Place Eschershausen, Germany, 51n56, 9e38
Timezone LMT m9e38 (is local mean time)
Data source
Quoted BC/BR
Rodden Rating AA
Collector: Müller
Astrology data s_su.18.gif s_vircol.18.gif 15°16' s_mo.18.gif s_libcol.18.gif 14°00 Asc.s_aqucol.18.gif 29°47'



Biography

German writer best known for realistic novels of middle-class life.

After leaving school in Wolfenbüttel in 1849, Raabe was apprenticed for four years to a Magdeburg book dealer, during which time he read widely. Although he attended lectures at Berlin University, the important product of his time in Berlin was his popular first novel, published under his pseudonym, Jakob Corvinus Die Chronik der Sperlingsgasse (1857; “The Chronicle of Sperling Street”), which depicts episodes in the lives lived out on one small street. In 1856 Raabe returned to Wolfenbüttel, determined to make a living as a writer. He published a number of novels and story collections, none of which attracted much attention, and then set out to travel through Austria and Germany.

In 1862 he married and settled in Stuttgart, where he lived until 1870. During the Stuttgart years he wrote his then most successful novels, Der Hungerpastor, 3 vol. (1864; The Hunger-Pastor),Abu Telfan, oder Die Heimkehr vom Mondgebirge, 3 vol. (1868; Abu Telfan, Return from the Mountains of the Moon), and Der Schüdderump, 3 vol. (1870; “The Rickety Cart”). These three novels are often viewed as a trilogy that is central to Raabe’s generally pessimistic outlook, which views the difficulties of the individual in a world over which he has little control. Discouraged by a lack of public acclaim in Stuttgart, Raabe returned to Braunschweig, where he spent the last 40 years of his life. He specialized in short stories and involved shorter novels, which are now considered his most original, revealing a mature acceptance of compromise between the old order and the bewildering changes brought about by industrialization and urbanization.

He died 15 November 1910, Braunschweig.


Link to Wikipedia biography

Events

Source Notes

Arno Müller, vol 2

Categories

  • Vocation : Writers : Fiction

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