Jean, Paul

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Name
Jean, Paul Gender: M
Richter, Johann Paul Friedrich
born on 21 March 1763 at 01:30 (= 01:30 AM )
Place Wunsiedel, Germany, 50n02, 12e0
Timezone LMT m12e0 (is local mean time)
Data source
Quoted BC/BR
Rodden Rating AA
Collector: Müller
Astrology data s_su.18.gif s_aricol.18.gif 00°09' s_mo.18.gif s_gemcol.18.gif 10°22 Asc.s_sagcol.18.gif 20°53'



Paul Jean

Biography

German novelist and humorist whose works were immensely popular in the first 20 years of the 19th century.

Jean published two collections of satiric essays in the style of Jonathan Swift, Grönländische Prozesse (1783; The Greenland Lawsuits) and Auswahl aus des Teufels Papieren (1789; “Selection from the Devil’s Papers”), but these were unsuccessful, and he was forced to support himself as a private tutor (1787–90) and schoolmaster (1790–94). About 1790 a personal crisis prompted him to forsake bitter satire for sentimental humour in his writings. He became a celebrity and was lionized by the critic Johann Herder and by a patron, Frau von Kalb, who brought him to Weimar.

The second period in Jean Paul’s work is marked by his attempts to reconcile the comic satirist and the sentimental enthusiast in himself.

The novels of his third period mirror his disillusionment with both Classicism and Romanticism. But his idyllic novels, always marked by humour, treat his predicament in a comic style. He thought, talked, and wrote wittily. In 1808 he received a pension from Prince Karl Theodore von Dalberg, later paid by the Bavarian government, which guaranteed him financial security. He continued to write novels and treatises on education and aesthetics.

Jean Paul’s novels are peculiar combinations of sentiment, irony, and humour expressed in a highly subjective and involuted prose style that is marked by rapid transitions of mood. Jean Paul greatly influenced his contemporaries by his simple piety, humanity and warmth, his religious attitude toward nature, and his beguiling mixture of sentimentality, fantasy, and humour.

In September 1821 Jean Paul lost his only son, Max, a youth of the highest promise; and he never quite recovered from this shock. He lost his sight in 1824 and died of dropsy at Bayreuth, on 14 November 1825.


Link to Wikipedia biography

Events

Source Notes

Arno Müller, vol 2

Categories

  • Vocation : Writers : Fiction
  • Vocation : Writers : Humor

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