Van Lerberghe, Charles

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Name
van Lerberghe, Charles Gender: M
born on 21 October 1861 at 22:00 (= 10:00 PM )
Place Gent, Belgium, 51n03, 3e43
Timezone LMT m3e43 (is local mean time)
Data source
Quoted BC/BR
Rodden Rating AA
Collector: Gauquelin
Astrology data s_su.18.gif s_libcol.18.gif 28°30' s_mo.18.gif s_gemcol.18.gif 02°28 Asc.s_cancol.18.gif 26°27'



Charles van Lerberghe

Biography

Belgian poet, short-story writer, and playwright whose reputation rests largely on two collections of poems—Entrevisions (1898; “Glimpses”) and La Chanson d’Ève (1904; “The Song of Eve”)—that exemplify his lyrical talent and idealistic outlook.

A fellow student of Maurice Maeterlinck and encouraged by the Belgian Symbolist Georges Rodenbach, Van Lerberghe in 1886 published his first poems in the Parisian magazine La Pléiade. His next published work, the macabre prose drama Les Flaireurs (1889; “The Trackers”), owes much to Henrik Ibsen. Though it was later disowned by its author, Les Flaireurs (together with one of Maeterlinck’s early works) marks the beginning of the Symbolist “theater of anguish.”

Although his first poems had been published 12 years earlier, Van Lerberghe did not issue a collection until Entrevisions. It consists of 64 poems, some written in free verse. Influenced by Henri Bergson’s theory of duration, these poems explore themes of transience and beauty through vague, indistinct images of the natural world. During this period Van Lerberghe traveled widely in Europe, eventually settling in rural Bouillon, Belgium, to write his masterpiece, La Chanson d’Ève. The predominantly free-verse poems of that volume, influenced by Italian painting, offer up a set of allegorical tableaux in which Eve appears as a primal poet symbolizing universal values. These poems were further publicized when Gabriel Fauré, one of the premier composers of the period, used them as text for one of his masterful song cycles.

He died 26 October 1861.


Link to Wikipedia biography (French)

Source Notes

Gauquelin vol 6

Categories

  • Vocation : Writers : Poet

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