Tsiolkas, Christos

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Name
Tsiolkas, Christos Gender: M
born on 25 October 1965 at 19:15 (= 7:15 PM )
Place Richmond, Australia, 37s49, 145e0
Timezone AEST h10e (is standard time)
Data source
From memory
Rodden Rating A
Collector: Scholfield
Astrology data s_su.18.gif s_scocol.18.gif 01°45' s_mo.18.gif s_scocol.18.gif 11°48 Asc.s_taucol.18.gif 08°17'



Biography

Greek-Australian experimental writer, editor and short-film maker whose controversial novel "Loaded" has been critically acclaimed as a forerunner in a new genre of "queer" multicultural fiction that explores issues of sexual politics and "intercultural racism."

Tsiolkas was born in 1965 in Melbourne, the city with the largest Greek population outside Athens. His Greek immigrant parents were both factory laborers and he was raised in an inner-city Greek district. He attended Melbourne University and completed a BA in 1987. That year he also became editor of the student newspaper "Farrago," later contributing to and co-designing the literary "Arena" magazine. Since then he has worked a variety of jobs but remains committed to a career in writing with occasional forays into Super-8 film-making.

His first semi-autobiographical novel is the gritty "Loaded" 1995, an insightful exploration of 24 hours in the life of a young alienated and nihilistic bisexual working class man from an immigrant minority culture. In this continuous monologue, the angry and confused protagonist, Ari, tries to deal with his outsider status as an unemployed drug user who is neither wholly Greek nor Australian, nor entirely straight or gay, in a contemporary world that values wealth and well-defined categories. Ari's best friend Johnny/Toula is a drag queen. The book is loaded with uncompromising and frequently shocking language, and is filled with rough sex, hard drugs, and popular film and musical references, as the 19-year-old Ari proceeds in a

Hell-bent fashion to destroy himself on his journey through Melbourne's Greek, gay and pub cultures. "Loaded" was followed by "The Jesus Man" 1999, while the forthcoming "Dead Europe" deals with ghosts of anti-Semitism within Greek culture. Tsiolkas co-authored "Jump Cuts: An Autobiography" in 1996 and many of his short stories have also been published. His acclaimed plays include "Whose Afraid of The Working Class?", "Blue Poles" and "Elektra AD." He co-made the short film "Thug" that appeared on SBS's "Eat Carpet" in 1998. The highly successful film "Head On," 1998, is based on "Loaded" and stars young Greek-Australian heartthrob Alex Dimitriades as Ari and gay diva Paul Capsis as Johnny/Toula. Tsiolkas currently co-edits the alternative literary publication "Refo." He has been in a committed relationship with his boyfriend since the mid-1980s.

Link to Wikipedia biography

Events

  • Social : End a program of study 1987 (BA from Melbourne University)
  • Work : New Career 1987 (Editor of the student newspaper)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1995 (Book "Loaded" released)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1998 (Co-made movie)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1998 (Release of movie "Head On")
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1999 (Book released)

Source Notes

Sy Scholfield quotes Tsiolkas for his date, year and time of birth in his book "Dead Europe." An extract of the book with his data appears in an online ABC Radio transcript at "http://www.abc.net.au/rn/arts/radioeye/stories/s52588.htm". Various biographical references give his place of birth as Melbourne while the suburb of Richmond is specified in an article in "The Sydney Star Observer," 7/09/1998, p. 13.

Birth location adjusted for coordinates of the Melbourne suburb of Richmond.

Categories

  • Family : Relationship : Mate - Same sex
  • Passions : Sexuality : Homosexual male
  • Vocation : Writers : Autobiographer
  • Vocation : Writers : Fiction (Short stories and novels)
  • Vocation : Writers : Magazine/ newsletter (Contributor and co-designer)
  • Vocation : Writers : Publisher/ Editor (Editor)

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