Mann, Thomas

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Name
Mann, Thomas Gender: M
born on 6 June 1875 at 10:15 (= 10:15 AM )
Place Lübeck, Germany, 53n52, 10e40
Timezone LMT m10e40 (is local mean time)
Data source
Quoted BC/BR
Rodden Rating AA
Collector: Rodden
Astrology data s_su.18.gif s_gemcol.18.gif 15°14' s_mo.18.gif s_cancol.18.gif 19°42 Asc.s_vircol.18.gif 01°29'



Thomas Mann

Biography

German writer, the author of novels, plays and essays. Mann won the Nobel Prize for literature for "Buddenbrooks," based on his family, in 1929. Throughout his career, Mann was respected by critics and popular with the reading public. He had the ability to turn personal biography into literature. His novel, "The Blood of the Walsungs" was based on the lives of his wife's family. Mann was inspired to write by the encouragement of his elder brother, Heinrich, who became a successful novelist in his own right. Mann left Germany during the rise of Nazism and in 1938 moved to the U.S. becoming a naturalized citizen in 1944.

Thomas grew up in a wealthy merchant family in Lubeck, Germany. His father was a grain merchant and city senator. His mother was a pianist and a planter's daughter from German-Brazilian parentage. As a boy, he loved to day dream and visit the sea. He hated school and failed twice. In 1891, his dad died and the family grain business was liquidated. At 16, his mom moved the family to Munich. It was that year when Thomas began to write his first collection of short stories.

As an army draftee, he contracted tendentious after a few drill parades and soon discovered the army was not a place for him. In 1901, his work "Buddenbrooks" was published. making him a popular author in Germany. With the excellent notices from his novel at the age of 26, Mann settled into writing career. During WW I, he wrote his manifesto on German patriotism, "Meditations of a Nonpolitical." In 1924, his book, "Magic Mountain" was published. His works included "Joseph In Egypt," 1938 and "Doctor Faustus" in 1947. His experience with WW I gave way to a stand on principle against Nazism during the rise of Hitler in the 1930s. In February 1933, Mann gave a speech about Wagner which upset Hitler and the Nazi Party. He continued a lecture tour of the Netherlands but found German newspapers highly critical of his political views. In October 1933, Mann made his home in Zurich, Switzerland, finding himself no longer welcome in Germany. He eventually settled in Los Angeles, when he was 70.

In 1905, Mann married Katia Pringsheim, the Jewish daughter of a mathematician, a family whose members were among the German Jewish elite. In 1907, Mann called himself a philo-Semite. His school friends, publishers, and people he preferred to keep company with were from the Jewish heritage. Mann was far from an orthodox Aryan, believing German Jews appreciated excellent writing and artistic pursuits. After two years of marriage, Mann began to resent being tied down to a wife and child. Mann and his wife eventually produced six children. They vacationed at exclusive spas and were attended by servants where ever they traveled. As a writer, Mann hated discipline.

Mann died of a rupture of an arteria caused by arteriosclerosis and thrombosis on 12 August 1955 in Zürich, Switzerland.

Link to Wikipedia biography

Relationships

  • parent->child relationship with Mann, Erika (born 9 November 1905)
  • parent->child relationship with Mann, Golo (born 27 March 1909)
  • parent->child relationship with Mann, Klaus (born 18 November 1906)
  • has other family relationship with Dohm, Hedwig (born 20 September 1831). Notes: grandmother of Mann's wife Katia
  • has other family relationship with Gründgens, Gustaf (born 22 December 1899). Notes: Gründgens was married with daughter Erika Mann during three years

Events

  • Death of Father 1891
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1901 (Book, "Buddenbrooks")
  • Relationship : Marriage 1905 (Katia Pringsheim)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1924 (Book, "Magic Mountain")
  • Work : Prize 1929 (Nobel Prize for Literature)
  • Social : Great Publicity February 1933 (Speech upset Hitler and Nazis)
    chart Placidus Equal_H.
  • Family : Change residence October 1933 (Moved to Zurich, Switzerland)
    chart Placidus Equal_H.
  • Family : Change residence 1938 (Moved to the U.S.)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1938 (Book, "Joseph In Egypt")
  • Social : Joined group 1944 (Became naturalized citizen of U.S.)
  • Work : Published/ Exhibited/ Released 1947 (Book, "Doctor Faustus")
  • Death by Disease 12 August 1955 (rupture of blood vessel, age 80)
    chart Placidus Equal_H.

Source Notes

Gunther Menzer quotes B.R.

Categories

  • Diagnoses : Body Part Problems : Circulatory problems (Phlebitis, terminal)
  • Diagnoses : Body Part Problems : Bone (Tendonitous)
  • Family : Childhood : Advantaged (Wealthy merchant family)
  • Family : Childhood : Order of birth (Second of two boys)
  • Family : Childhood : Sibling circumstances (Brother famous writer)
  • Family : Relationship : Number of Marriages (One)
  • Family : Relationship : Stress - Chronic misery (Resented being tied down)
  • Family : Parenting : Kids more than 3 (Six)
  • Lifestyle : Work : Work alone/ Singular role
  • Lifestyle : Financial : Wealthy
  • Lifestyle : Social Life : Travel (Exclusive spas)
  • Lifestyle : Home : Expatriate (Germany to U.S.)
  • Personal : Death : Long life more than 80 yrs (Age 80)
  • Vocation : Education : Public speaker (Lecturer)
  • Vocation : Military : Military service (Drafted into army)
  • Vocation : Writers : Fiction
  • Vocation : Writers : Playwright/ script
  • Vocation : Writers : Textbook/ Non-fiction (Patriotic manifesto)
  • Notable : Awards : Nobel prize (Literature)
  • Notable : Famous : Top 5% of Profession
  • Notable : Book Collection : American Book

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